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Code

Halcyon Theme for VS Code, Atom, and Others

I came across this gorgeous blue theme and thought I’d share it with you. Just… 😍

Halcyon theme demo

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Code

Unpopular Opinion: Switching to WordPress in 2019

I enjoyed reading this. WordPress is definitely not the flashiest of choices, but I echo a lot of Blake’s sentiments.

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Code

CSS Lists, Markers, And Counters

Rachel Andrew writing for Smashing Magazine:

The ::marker pseudo-element allows you to target the list marker — separately from the content of the list item. This was not possible in previous versions of CSS, therefore, if you changed the color or font size of the ul or li, this would also change the color and font size of the markers. In order to do something as seemingly simple as having different color list bullets than text, would involve either wrapping the content of the list item in a span (or using an image for the marker).

Can I get a finally? It’s simple stuff like this that makes me empathize with people who complain about CSS. This is a perfect candidate for progressive enhancement, where it’ll fallback pretty gracefully on browsers that don’t support ::marker yet.

(via Piccalilli by Andy Bell)

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Code

Image Optimization In WordPress

Adelina Țucă writing for Smashing Magazine:

Do not underestimate the impact of image optimization. Images are always one of the main reasons for a slow website. Google doesn’t like slow websites and nor do your visitors and clients.

This is the type of stuff that’s pretty awesome with WordPress. Most issues you could be having, there’s most likely someone already out there with a solution. I went ahead and installed Adelina’s suggestion of Optimole and saw immediate performance gains. If you use WordPress and love to blog with photos like I do, give this article a read.

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Code

How to Use the Web Share API

Ayooluwa Isaiah writing for CSS-Tricks:

This approach provides a number of advantages over conventional methods:

  • The user is presented with a wide range of options for sharing content compared to the limited number you might have in your implementation.
  • You can improve your page load times by doing away with third-party scripts from individual social platforms.
  • You don’t need to add a series of buttons for different social media sites and email. A single button is sufficient to trigger the device’s native sharing options.
  • Users can customize their preferred share targets on their own device instead of being limited to just the predefined options.

The Web Share API looks insanely cool and doesn’t look too difficult to implement. I may give this a try sometime this week.

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Code

The Difference Between Nested Grids and Nested Tables

Fantastic explanation from Rachel Andrew. This line stuck out to me:

We weren’t taking semantic HTML and changing the display method used on it, we were creating a layout structure in HTML then shoving our design into the gaps, shattering it into bits as we did so.

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Code

Creating a Full Bleed CSS Utility

This looks very useful.

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Code

H&Co Finally Offers Full Library to Cloud.typography Subscribers

For years, Cloud.typography has included any five fonts of your choosing, and the rest available to purchase. Today we’re making things a lot simpler, a lot more flexible, and a lot more valuable: every Cloud.typography subscription now includes access to our complete library of fonts to use on the web.

Amazing news! Hoefler & Co. has such an amazing collection of fonts, it was a shame to be limited to just five. Can’t wait to use more of these typefaces in my personal projects.

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Code

Tools Perfect for Nerds

Boy, I knew Brett Terpstra was prolific, but this list is nuts. If you’re a developer or write markdown frequently, I’m sure you’ll find more than one of Brett’s projects to be incredibly useful.

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Code

Cherish Thine .dotfiles

Earlier this year, I started to feel it was time to buy a new Mac, but wanted to make a sensible and adult decision. I’d wait till the Fall, see what Apple had announced for the year, and then decide.

The Fall Apple events came and went, and none of the new announcements spoke to me. While the Mac mini looked interesting, I’d need to plug in an eGPU for the video editing I do. I didn’t want to maintain another expensive piece of hardware.

One day while I was hanging out in the #applenerds channel in the Changelog Slack, someone brought up buying refurbished. One of my previous Mac’s was purchased refurbished from Apple, and I’d had no issues with it. To my surprise, there was a refurbished 2018 MacBook Pro with a bigger hard drive, faster processor, and more RAM than my previous Mac. After talking to my wife, the buy button was clicked.

Getting a new machine always makes me ner-cited (nervous and excited). You get used to the way you’ve setup a machine—which depending how long you’ve had it—there’s no telling how many settings you’ve customized just right to your tastes.

All this makes me a lot less anxious these days though. Ever since I started version controlling my .dotfiles on GitHub, and putting all my files in Dropbox, moving to a new machine is a lot simpler. Sure, it’ll still take you a few hours. This last time took about 3-4 hours, but it was mostly headache free. And more importantly, I don’t have that feeling of, “did I forget anything on my old machine?”

If you’re curious about how I do it, I’ve written extensively on my process for setting up new machines. It could probably be automated even furthur, but it’s a pretty sweet setup.