Categories
Design

Solid Vs. Outline Icons: Which Are Faster to Recognize?

Anthony T on UX Movement:

Some think the difference between them is just a matter of preference, but research shows there’s more to it than that–one style has a faster recognition rate than the other.

Fascinating. I remember a few years ago an article circulated arguing against outline icons because of cognitive load (can’t find the link, sorry), but it turns out the decision is a bit more complex than that.

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Design

Building a UI Kit in Figma

This deep dive by Robin Rendle into Gusto’s UI Kit was an intriguing read. The work on a design system is often tedious, thankless, and unfortunately, invisible at times.

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Design

Slack Gets a New Logo

Lots of commotion over this redesign, and to a certain extent, it’s completely understandable. While I don’t find myself feeling “repulsed,” this new direction certainly feels like a regression. There was a lot of brand equity, thrown away for what ultimately feels generic.

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Design

New Logo and Identity for the 2018 Brand New Conference

Armin Vit on Brand New:

This year’s identity is based on a cliché but we liked where that cliché took us so we went with it: New York is a “Concrete Jungle”, ergo we are going to use concrete. This wasn’t conceived as a metaphor but as the literal, core ingredient through which we would standardize all the materials.

I don’t think I’ve seen something like this before. They literally glued slabs of concrete as the cover of the programs. I can’t even imagine the work involved in making these, but the execution is masterful.

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Design

New Logo and Identity for Uber

Armin Vit in another great logo and identity redesign review on Brand New:

I am guessing that this is not the negative review most people expected. I understand the gut reaction of seeing the new logo and thinking “Seriously? That’s it?”. I had that reaction, no doubt, and, in the annals of logo design this doesn’t even rank nor does it make the cut in any way as an exciting, industry-shifting identity but as public-facing manifestation of a company attempting a drastic change to be perceived as safe and trustworthy, as universally accessible, and as a seamless part of literally millions of people’s lives and livelihoods this has the potential — AS LONG AS UBER DELIVERS ON THE PROMISE OF POSITIVE CHANGE — to become one of the most significant identity redesign and corporate rebrand case studies we will discuss 20 years from now.

Uber has been disappointing for the past few years, but this identity redesign is pretty great. The versatility of this system is impressive, and speaks to the changes they seem to be trying to make. Like Armin, I’m still using Lyft for the time being, but my boycott of Uber may be coming to its end.

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Design

Web Typography: Designing Tables to be Read, Not Looked At

Richard Rutter in an excerpt from his new book, Web Typography published on A List Apart:

Despite the huge variation in table size, complexity, contents and purpose, every table shares two simple design principles: they should be readable and support a sense of the data held within. They should not be prettied up to satisfy a sense of aesthetic when simply looked at. That said, a well-designed table can still be a thing of beauty but with the form following the function. Tables are not pictures of data: they are catalogues of data to be perused, parsed, referenced and interrogated. A well-designed table will enable the information to be read and understood, and will reveal the patterns and correlations inherent in the data.

I feel like we’re predisposed to hate tables. But this piece reminded me that tables can be readable and beautiful with some simple CSS. I’ll be honest, I learned some new CSS that I’m eager to use next time I need to style a table.

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Design

The Era of Newshammer

Uncle Dave redesigned his website and it’s looking great. I always find it fun to see how people approach building their personal sites. Often, we build these the way we wish we could build everything else. That “Git It Gurl” theme is 🔥.

Great job Dave.

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Design

Letter from the Wirecutter Team

The Wirecutter Team:

Today we are relaunching our website to make it easier for our readers to find and buy the things they need. The new site is the result of months of research, design, coding, and—critically—dozens of conversations with readers to make sure we focused on what really matters.

Collectively (and with our own money) Wirecutter staffers have bought thousands of the same products we recommend to you, and we rely on them daily in our own lives and homes.

The new branding and design of Wirecutter has been executed very well. I loved the content of their previous site, but this is a beautiful marriage of form and function. Articles are now responsive, the type is great on the eyes, and finding a category you’re looking for is easier than before. I think they’ve made the site easier for discovery of new things as well.

All in all, hats off to the team. 👏🏽

Categories
Design

Redbox Brand Gets Atrocious Redesign

Armin Vit on Brand New:

The old logo was an expected, acceptable, and decent evolution of the original Redbox logo. It sill wasn’t a great logo but it was properly executed and it shed the start-up-y vibe of the first logo. All Redbox had to do was stay the course and slowly implement the 2016 redesign unto the thousands of kiosks all around the U.S.. Instead, only a year after the redesign, they have changed to what is possibly the worst logo of the year.

What. Were. They. Thinking?!

Armin continues:

The way the letters touch is horrible, the slabs are clumsy, the “e” is wonky, and they have made the cardinal sin of the “db” pair, which is spacing them so tightly that they look like a penis.

🤦🏽‍♂️

Categories
Design

Webfonts on the Prairie

Richard Fink on A List Apart:

If you can only be certain of what’s under your control on your server, which would you rather have—the certainty of webfonts that are precisely what you and your users want and need, or the crapshoot of fonts preinstalled by makers of operating systems that present you with moving targets that vary from platform to platform?

Webfonts—the ones designers choose—are the true “web-safe” fonts. They always were. If ever there was a time when, by chance, system fonts offered a safe and simple haven for web designers, those days are long gone.

Richard does an excellent job of arguing in favor of webfonts. I for one, completely agree. It seems crazy to give up one of the most useful and important design tools when with a little bit of work, we can make the experience great for the user. Yes, webfonts aren’t where we want them yet, but waving a white flag will only stall the great progress already made.